Stranded

Imagine being stranded on an island with only one other person: a person you don’t particularly want to be with; not necessarily one you hate, but certainly one who has brought you some hardship.

Isla Contoy
Such is the scenario with Javier, a grade 8 student about to make the rocky transition from elementary school to high school.

During a summer holiday with his mother, a journey partly recognized as an escape from his father’s abuse, Javier goes on a snorkelling adventure off the coast of Cancún. Coincidentally, one of his teachers in Canada, who has often expressed an interest in Mexico, ends up on the same excursion.

Javier and the teacher, Mr. Cameron, are caught up in a norte, one of the infamous storms that lands on parts of Mexico in August. Unfortunately for them, they are in the middle of the Caribbean at the time and are swept by a strong current towards an island.

Cameron recognizes the island, a popular tourist destination because of its bird sanctuary. Due to the rough weather, though, all visits to the island have been cancelled, and there are no other inhabitants besides Javier and Cameron.

Javier’s independence and distrust in authority will not let him be shackled to the ways and ideas of Cameron. But, given the time the two have together, they soon come to understand a little bit about each other.

In fact, Javier learns that Cameron is harbouring a dark secret, one which has changed his view of life drastically.

This story will soon be available in my new YA novel, Adrift (Note: there might be a title change).

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About randycoates

Randy Coates graduated from the University of Waterloo with a bachelor of arts degree and went on to acquire his teacher’s certificate at the University of Western Ontario. He is currently an elementary teacher in the Toronto District Board of Education.
This entry was posted in Getting Older, Love and Commitment, Mexican History, Mythology, Parenting, Teaching, Tradition, Travelling and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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