An Impatient World

I just got back from eating at The Keg Restaurant.

When I arrived, there were no tables available and I was told I’d have a 10-minute wait so I made my way to the bar and took a seat. I had only been sitting two minutes when a manager-type guy (I won’t describe him; they always look the same) saw me sitting. I guess I looked forlorn because he asked if I had been helped.

keg

“No,” I told him, simply answering the question. I certainly wasn’t complaining.

He seemed shocked. “I’m very sorry that you had to wait,” he said. He took my drink order and said it was on him.

Less than 10 minutes later, a table became available.

I was sitting there less than two minutes when the server came over and apologized that I had been waiting. She took my meal order. I ordered a steak well done but it came red and bloody so I politely asked for it to be sent back and cooked longer.

At the end of the meal, I asked for the bill and noticed that the manager had, indeed, not charged me for the first glass of wine. I flagged my server and told her she could include the charge; I really didn’t mind since I had not been waiting long in the bar to be served.

“Do people actually complain,” I asked her, “when they’ve only been waiting two minutes to be served?”

“Some do,” she said, encouraging me to accept the bill discount because I was as much a customer as those who complained.

Is this what the world is coming to? And am I so surprised that people want instant gratification?

After all, they have to know answers so quickly that their iPhones are out automatically to solve a question that arises. No one seems to believe in mystery any more.

People cannot sit alone, or even be stimulated by the company of friends, before they start playing with their phones.

So maybe restaurants are trying to keep up by serving people as quickly as they can, worrying that they’ll lose customers if they don’t.

I told my server that when I go to restaurants, I like to take my time.

So bring my steak slowly and bring it well done, thank you very much. I didn’t actually say this but if I had, she probably wouldn’t have cared anyway.

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About randycoates

Randy Coates graduated from the University of Waterloo with a bachelor of arts degree and went on to acquire his teacher’s certificate at the University of Western Ontario. He is currently an elementary teacher in the Toronto District Board of Education.
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